“Where’s the party?”

So often, while investigating, we act as though the spirits are right beside us wherever we go. We behave as if the doors to rooms are impassible barriers, and that the invisible residents trapped within are patiently waiting for us to enter. The extent to which we tend to limit spirit movement is alarming to me, so I try very hard not to make those kinds of assumptions. Spirits may indeed be hold-up in the bedroom, but where’s the guarantee? Why are we so certain of that?

I frequently move in and out of rooms unpredictably or position myself in hallways, foyers, and staircases – more centralized areas, because I believe they more comfortably watch us from a “safe distance.” I think it’s human nature, and therefore spirit nature, to establish a kind of DMZ between strangers – especially considering the intensity of a paranormal investigation and the potential for heightened emotions. I think this is backed up by the frequency of EVP I’ve captured on remote devices planted in adjoining areas. A recent investigation serves as a clear example. Most of our attention was given to the living room. The previous homeowner died in that room, and it was the only spot that provided any contact with the team medium. However, one of my personal video cameras was parked in an adjoining family room throughout our visit, and produced more EVP than any other device – by far.

There are really very few indicators available to aid in determining location “hot spots,” so I try to place remote devices in the least interesting areas and visit them less often during the proceedings. On the aforementioned investigation, not only was I able to record more EVP on that remote device, I was also blessed with some interesting, though inconclusive, video anomalies. One EVP was especially fascinating and actually makes my point. It said, “The party’s in here,” and that certainly seemed to be the case. If I relied solely on recording devices I could carry, that gem and others would have been lost, and that would have been a shame. Perhaps we would be better served to look where we’re not.
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Also visit The Voices Blog at http://thevoicesblog.wordpress.com

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Settling In

Often, after setting up the equipment, we vacate the building and let it rest. There’s an obvious and necessary flutter of activity getting everything in place for a good investigation, but letting the location settle for awhile might be the best tactic of the day. It makes perfect sense too – offers a resident spirit (or more) the chance to feel at peace again. Investigations are almost always tranquil endeavors; not usually loud or active – a striking contrast to the set-up. A few minutes of silence and a return to the status quo is a reasonable segway to the actual investigation.

Over the years, this methodology has provided us with some compelling footage. On one occasion, we observed video of an apparition moving freely throughout one of the rooms, while we cooled our heels outside. It was the only verifiable video evidence we were ever blessed to gather during seven visits. Video evidence can be more acceptable when there’s no danger of investigator contamination – audio, as well, so if everyone on the team is locked outside, whatever is recorded leaps on the credibility scale.

Personally, I’ve always felt that these moments of peace give spirits a time to accept our presence; to begin viewing us as an inevitability. We’ve left our calling card of cameras, recorders, and meters, and when we finally return in person, they’ve had time to acclimate and consider the level to which they intend to cooperate. We give them time to adjust, and maybe even to explore the devices we’ve left.

Perhaps most importantly, the results seem to indicate that this tact is productive. Statistically, we’ve recorded more EVP throughout the night, and captured more video evidence when we’ve allowed the location this time to settle and prepare.

There are all kinds of ways to conduct a successful investigation, and the ambience of the location itself is a huge contributing factor, but I think it’s always a good idea to pause, take this metaphorical deep breath, and let the spiritual inhabitants do the same. Since most investigations are less than fruitful, we need all the help we can get, and by allowing the location to rest, the idea of “us” settles in as well.
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Also visit The Voices Blog at http://thevoicesblog.wordpress.com